Education Program (Thursday, June 4)

Program is subject to change. View full stream descriptions here.

Session 1, 9:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.


Stream 1: Transitioning to LEED v4: The Path to Continuous Improvement

Meeting Room 11

The Policy Conundrum - Steering a Big Ship Toward Change

LEED Specific (ND)

Arsheel Hirji, Leader, Sustainable Infrastructure, Engineering and Energy Services, City of Calgary

Description: Calgary was the first municipality in Canada to implement a Sustainable Building Policy requiring new City-financed construction and renovations to achieve a targeted level of certification. Today, Calgary finds itself at a crossroads of significant change. Calgarians are often at the forefront of innovation, but changing economic times mean that they are faced with tough decisions when encouraging sustainability in building design and operation. This presentation will focus on how Calgary is updating sustainable building and procurement policies in preparing for LEED V4, while ensuring that they strive toward returns on investment of public dollars on sustainable building projects.


Stream 2: New Tools and Programs to Increase Performance and Resiliency in Green Buildings

Meeting Room 12

How Feasible are Passive House Heating Targets for Multi-unit Residential Buildings in Canada?

Curt Hepting, President, EnerSys Analytics Inc.

Description:  Energy performance for new concrete multi-unit residential buildings (MURBs) in Canada generally has not improved over existing construction. Passive House, a German-based energy label, is one program that helps buildings achieve low-energy designs. One key target of Passive House limits buildings to space heating loads that are not to exceed 15 kWh/m². CMHC commissioned a study to examine how this heating target might be met across Canada given its relatively harsh climate, existing design practices, and its readily-available technologies. This presentation reviews our findings for the viability of limiting concrete MURBs to the Passive House space heating requirement across Canada.


Stream 3: International Green Building Innovations: What Can We Learn?

Meeting Room 15

California High Speed Rail: Regenerative Station Design

Jenny McMinn, Green Building and Energy Services Business Manager, Halsall Associates; Maeri Machado, Project Manager, Halsall Associates; Margaret Cederoth, Senior Planner, Parsons Brinckerhoff

Description: The California High Speed Rail (CHSR) project is the first of its kind in North America. When complete the system will provide high speed rail service from Sacramento to San Diego. The CHSR Authority has made a commitment to high performance design for the station buildings. This presentation will examine the opportunities that have been explored for high performance regenerative design of the stations to create a net positive impact, connect and give back to the surrounding communities and enable the planning process.


Stream 4: Regenerative Design: The New Paradigm

Meeting Room 10

Business as a Regenerative Force

Juvarya Veltkamp, Manager, Green Economy Initiatives, Vancouver Economic Commission; Pietra Basilij, Sustainable Community Development, Vancouver Economic Commission

Description: Sustainable neighbourhood development requires solutions that preserve and restore the environment, as well as sustain and regenerate the economy and society. Green economic development is an emerging field that is being integrated into district scale sustainability in the City of Vancouver. This session will be run by Vancouver Economic Commission, and will focus on: integrating green economic development into sustainable/regenerative neighbourhood development; leveraging the capacity of businesses, academic institutions, municipal and regional governments, and community organizations to reach common environmental and economic goals; examples from Vancouver, including development of a Green Enterprise Zone in the False Creek Flats industrial area; and discussion of a set of indicators under development that will measure green economic development success (going beyond # jobs, $ invested or GDP and measuring regenerative qualities of economic development).


Stream 5: Closing The Performance Gap: Realizing the Full Benefits of Green Buildings

Meeting Room 8

The CIRS Building: A Case Study of the Performance Gap

LEED Specific (BD+C, ID+C)

Andrea Frisque, Senior Building Performance Specialist, Morrison Hershfield; Kendal Bushe, Associate Professor, University of British Columbia

Description: We will explore the differences in anticipated performance and measured performance for the LEED Platinum-certified Center for Interactive Research on Sustainability (CIRS). CIRS has some 3000 measurement points which provide detailed information about how the building has been used and operated. The performance goals and measured performance for CIRS will be presented and the gaps between these will be discussed. The energy performance gap will be analyzed in detail using energy modelling analysis. The energy savings calculated according to LEED Canada for the as-built building will be examined.

Session 2, 10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.


Stream 1: Transitioning to LEED v4: The Path to Continuous Improvement

Meeting Room 11

Material Transparency: How to Research Materials

LEED Specific (BD+C, ID+C)

Scott Kelly, Principal, Re:Vision Architecture; Alex Vondeling, Associate, Re:Vision Architecture

Description: Material toxicity and manufacturer transparency concerns have gained more attention with the Living Building Challenge's Red List and LEED v4's HPDs requirement, etc. LBC project teams dive deep into materials research for products use on their projects, but only a small number of people are being trained to perform this very detailed research. To try and bring more people into the loop, the intent is to provide intermediate training on how to start to evaluate the potential materials toxicity and transparency of a product through manufacturer provided documentation and communication. The session will include definitions of industry terms, selected chemicals toxicity reviews, product review examples, and manufacturer communication tips.


Stream 2: New Tools and Programs to Increase Performance and Resiliency in Green Buildings

Meeting Room 12

Designing Buildings for Health and Wellness: Introducing the WELL Building Standard

Master Speaker: Paul Scialla, Founder, International WELL Building Institute

Description: Learn how emerging innovations and evidence-based research can be used design buildings that support the health and wellness of the people who live, work and learn in them. The WELL Building Standard is the first protocol of its kind to focus exclusively on human health and wellness in the built environment. It identifies specific conditions, that when holistically integrated into building architecture and design, enhance the health and wellbeing of occupants. Topics will include an introduction to the WELL Building Standard, costs and benefits, early examples of WELL buildings, and performance-based metrics for health and wellness in the built environment.


Stream 3: International Green Building Innovations: What Can We Learn?

Meeting Room 15

Lessons from IAQ Monitoring in China

Ryan Dick, Founder and COO, Global Innovations Green Algorithms (GIGA)

Description: Canadian air quality in China: When the air in Shanghai climbs above the healthy limit for chemicals and particulates, the air inside the B+H Architects, Glumac, Lend Lease, NRDC, Tishman Speyer, and M.Moser offices is as clean as the Rockies. Based on over 10 years of case studies, this discussion will share IAQ strategies and tools for regenerating occupant health via indoor spaces. Focusing on the impact of materials and real-time monitoring of IAQ results, the discussion will also show how these strategies are being applied to RESET, a rapidly growing Canadian-born project certification focused on health.


Stream 4: Regenerative Design: The New Paradigm

Meeting Room 10

Regeneration from the Outside In: Eco-effective Skins for Net Positive Buildings

Charles Marshall, Sustainability Consultant, DIALOG

Description: Making the evolutionary leap to regeneration means transforming how our buildings look, work, and feel. The building envelope is the key component in accelerating this change: it is the starting point for net-positive energy and the boundary where the building meets the ecosystem and the community. Regenerative buildings are highly efficient, durable, healthy, beautiful and engaging 'from the outside in'.  This session is a how-to manual for designing building envelopes for regenerative buildings and a look-forward to how our industry will continue to evolve with real project examples from Canada and around the world.


Stream 5: Closing The Performance Gap: Realizing the Full Benefits of Green Buildings

Meeting Room 8

Discoveries at Net Zero

LEED Specific (BD+C, ID+C)

Michael Leckman, Principal, Diamond Schmitt Architects; Chris Piche, Principal, Integral Group

Description: Low-energy buildings behave very differently than wasteful ones; those with extremely low energy intensity (EUI) perform in surprising and unexpected and perhaps counter-intuitive ways. Achieving extremely low EUI's relies on data from post-occupancy evaluations, iterative energy modelling, and scrutiny of the context for previously unconsidered sources of energy. This presentation illustrates the challenges, processes, and discoveries in achieving extremely low EUI, using three linked case studies on college buildings in western Canada, but focusing on Okanagan College's Trades Renewal and Expansion Project, which is targeting LEED Platinum, and net-zero energy.

Session 3, 1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.


Stream 1: Transitioning to LEED v4: The Path to Continuous Improvement

Meeting Room 11

Beyond Bins: What Certified Projects Tell Us About Design and Construction Waste Practices for LEED v4

LEED Specific (BD+C, ID+C)

Adam Stoker, Sustainability Consultant, University of Calgary; Zeina Elali, Project Manager, EllisDon Corporation; Kevin Stelzer, Principal, B+H Architects; Mark Hutchinson, Director, Green Building Programs, CaGBC

Description: To achieve next level performance in managing construction waste for LEED v4, project teams must develop a deeper understanding of how waste is generated and move beyond a waste diversion focus. Working with the CaGBC, the University of Calgary has examined construction waste information from LEED projects across Canada. This presentation will review the findings and discuss: How different project types produce waste differently? Are current LEED projects meeting new LEED v4 targets for total waste production (kg/m²)? The presenters will conclude with a moderated discussion on how designers and construction teams can each contribute to enhanced LEED v4 performance.


Stream 2: New Tools and Programs to Increase Performance and Resiliency in Green Buildings

Meeting Room 12

ecoMetrics: Demystifying Energy Metrics, Targets and Striving for Net-zero

Birgit Siber, Principal, Diamond Schmitt Architects; Mike Williams, Associate, Rowan Williams Davies & Irwin Inc.

Description: The most elusive sustainable design challenge is energy use reduction. Building codes, LEED, The 2030 Challenge all use different approaches to report energy reduction. EcoMetrics is a live database that currently showcases building energy simulation model results for over 30 LEED certified projects through the lens of each of these reporting approaches and the simplest metric: kWhr/m2. Visually accessible and interactive, this tool empowers us, our design teams and clients with the best available information; it raises our collective understanding of energy targets and methods used for energy reductions using real projects as reference to inform targets and decision making.


Stream 3: International Green Building Innovations: What Can We Learn?

Meeting Room 15

An Investment Perspective on Green Building

Master Speaker: Nils Kok, CEO and Founder, GRESB

Description: The property sector plays an important role in reducing the energy consumption and resource dependence of cities and nations around the world. As a result, there has been a recent surge in investments in the energy-efficiency and sustainability of buildings, witnessed by the rapid adoption of "green" labeling schemes. The market implications of energy efficiency and sustainability in the commercial and residential property market are relevant for (institutional) investors, real estate developers, but also for architects, product vendors and other stakeholders. This presentation adds significant weight to a growing body of evidence demonstrating that green-rated buildings may realize higher values, and vice versa, that less efficient buildings may increasingly face a risk of obsolescence. Nils will also shed light on how investors can integrate energy efficiency and sustainability into their real estate investment strategy, using the data gathered by GRESB (the Global Real Estate Sustainability Benchmark) as a tool.


Stream 4: Regenerative Design: The New Paradigm

Meeting Room 10

Mosaic: Living Building Challenge and LEED Platinum Under Conventional Budget and Ahead of Schedule

Vedran Skopac, Architect, HKA, Manasc Isaac Architects

Description: The Mosaic Centre for Conscious Community and Commerce is a game-changer that pushes the potential of green building in a northern climate to its full potential. The project will be Edmonton's first LEED® Platinum and Alberta's first Living Building Challenge petal certified building. These are incredibly ambitious goals for an Albertan commercial building, and a paradigm shift was required of the client, consultants and contractors on this project. Innovative technologies, IPD, progressive operational practices full occupant engagement enabled the design team to realize this groundbreaking project both ahead of schedule and under budget!


Stream 5: Closing The Performance Gap: Realizing the Full Benefits of Green Buildings

Meeting Room 8

Do our Green Buildings Perform as Intended?

Anna-Mareika Chu, MSc Student, Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability, University of British Columbia; Karine Le Duc, Senior Project Engineer, REDE ENERGY SOLUTIONS, LTD.; Dr. Shauna Mallory Hill, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Architecture, University of Manitoba; Dr. Mark Gorgolewski, Department of Architectural Science, Ryerson University

Description: This session will summarize the lessons learned from a project that undertook building performance evaluations of nine Canadian green buildings using a standardized framework and KPIs. The aim was to better understand the operational performance of the buildings, compare this to predicted performance and identify performance gaps and lessons for their owners, design teams and the construction industry in general. The project was initiated by iiSBE Canada with support from Stantec and NSERC. Researchers from the University of British Columbia, University of Manitoba, and Ryerson University worked with industry partners to develop an assessment protocol and conducted building performance evaluations.

Session 4, 3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.


Stream 1: Transitioning to LEED v4: The Path to Continuous Improvement

Meeting Room 11

Is LEED Equivalency Equal?

LEED Specific (BD+C, ID+C)

Mona Lemoine, Research and Innovation Director, Hughes Condon Marler Architects; Erica Letchford, Recollective Consulting; Brenda Martens, Founder and Principal, aedify

Description: Many municipalities and other owners have asked for projects that are "LEED Equivalent". For years, consultants and developers have struggled to determine what that means, with many different interpretations. Participants will revisit this issue, and try to determine whether there's a performance gap in buildings that are intended to be equivalent to LEED and what the industry is doing now. The presentation will be informed by a forum on the topic taking place in April 2015 in Vancouver.


Stream 2: New Tools and Programs to Increase Performance and Resiliency in Green Buildings

Meeting Room 12

Making District-scale Collaboration Work

Adam Beck, Director of Innovation, EcoDistricts; Jeff Ranson, Executive Director, 2030 District (Toronto) Moderator: David Ramslie, Principal, Integral Group

Description: District approaches have been advanced as a solution for achieving deep and sustained societal improvements in environmental performance. But how do District approaches work? And more importantly, how do we make District approaches work? This session looks at two emerging models for District sustainability, Ecodistricts and 2030 Districts, to understand their progress to date, and to explore the critical foundations for establishing a successful District model. We will focus on how Districts can effectively drive collective impact, including what collaboration really means and what YOUR role could be. Both approaches will be outlined to highlight the importance of governance and metrics, and the powerful "integrated design and delivery" process to align key stakeholders' and investors' interests, promote rigorous and holistic assessment, and accelerate catalytic district-scale projects over time.


Stream 3: International Green Building Innovations: What Can We Learn?

Meeting Room 15

New Developments from Austria

Tobias Waltjen, IBO-Austrian Institute for Healthy and Ecological Building

Description: This session provides an update of Austrian construction trends using the following resources: Summary of selected papers of the BauZ 2015 Vienna congress for sustainable building; Trends of building in the projects nominated for the 2014 Austrian State Prize for Architecture and Sustainability; the IBO Passivhaus catalogues of constructive details for new buildings (2009) and refurbishments (2012); and Trends in a catalogue of 50 innovative buildings to be published in Spring 2015 by Austrian Association "Innovative Gebäude" (the former IG Passivhaus).


Stream 4: Regenerative Design: The New Paradigm

Meeting Room 10

Regenerative Neighbourhoods: the Living Community Challenge and Integrated Urban Energy Systems

Martin Nielsen, Principal, DIALOG; Brad Liljequist, Technical Director, Living Building Challenge

Description: Building on the success and vision of the Living Building Challenge (LBC), the Living Community Challenge (LCC) takes the LBC to scale, looking at integrated solutions for net zero energy and water, Red List free materials, biophilic urban design, and equitable place. The LCC has been introduced into the existing context of district energy systems, a potentially powerful tool for achieving the LCC and more resilient communities. This session will provide an introduction to the LCC and case studies from its first year, and look at real and effective applications of district energy systems within its framework.


Stream 5: Closing The Performance Gap: Realizing the Full Benefits of Green Buildings

Meeting Room 8

How does an Institution Learn? Addressing the Performance Gap at UBC

Jennifer Sanguinetti, Director, Project Services, University of British Columbia; John Metras, Managing Director, Infrastructure Development​​, University of British Columbia

Description: How does an institution address the gap between expected and actual performance? What performance metrics are relevant and how do you define success? This presentation will tell the story of how UBC has studied its green buildings, what has been learned from them and what changes it is making in terms of practices, processes and culture. Starting from performance data on 80 of its buildings and moving through a changed understanding of what quality and performance mean, concrete examples of what we have learned and the steps we are taking to close the performance gap will be presented.