Education Program (Wednesday, June 3)

Program is subject to change.  View full stream descriptions here.

Session 1, 9:45 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.


Stream 1: Transitioning to LEED v4: The Path to Continuous Improvement

Meeting Room 11

Product Transformation: The Manufacturer's Journey towards Transparency and Optimization

LEED Specific (BD+C, ID+C)
Andrée Iffrig, Leader of the Green Team, DIRTT Environmental Solutions; Kellie Ballew, Product Sustainability Manager, Shaw Industries Inc.; Anita Snader, Environmental Sustainability Manager, Armstrong World Industries, Inc. Moderator: Marya Graff, Senior Associate, Cannon Design
Description: The new Material and Resource credits in LEED v4 introduce leading edge concepts on transparency and optimization, highlighting connections between product lifecycles and human and environmental health impacts. Join representatives from three product manufacturers as they discuss how they are responding to consumer demands for material transparency and optimization. Understand how these efforts are driving innovation and more responsible manufacturing practices.


Stream 2: New Tools and Programs to Increase Performance and Resiliency in Green Buildings

Meeting Room 12

Better Sustainability Reporting and Benchmarking with GRESB

Mark Bessoudo, Senior Analyst, Loop Initiatives; Emily Partington, Project Director, Loop Initiatives

Description: Investors are increasingly demanding better portfolio-scale sustainability reporting and benchmarking from their asset managers. The Global Real Estate Sustainability Benchmark (GRESB) has emerged as the universal tool to meet this opportunity. This session will highlight reporting and benchmarking trends in the Canadian real estate market and identify ways for property owners, investors and managers to take advantage of this rapidly evolving opportunity.


Stream 3: International Green Building Innovations: What Can We Learn?

Meeting Room 15

Lessons from Abroad: Sustainable Urban Development and the Future of Cities

Sue Clark, LEED Manager, Sweden Green Building Council; John Coster, Green Business Officer, Skanska USA Building; Tomas Gustafsson, Senior Sustainability Strategist and Advisor, City of Stockholm, Micah Lang, Vancouver Green Buildings Planning, City Advisor, C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group Moderator: Michelle Malanca, Vice President, World Green Building Council

Description: In a field as broad and diverse as sustainable urban development, international projects can provide important lessons – as well as inspiration. Innovations from abroad will be demonstrated through project-specific examples from City of Stockholm, Sweden Green Building Council, C40 Climate Leadership and Skanska. This session will also explore the role of environmental certification systems as a driver for sustainable urban development, as well as lessons learned on how to implement the triple bottom line of environmental, economic and social sustainability with a diverse range of public and private stakeholders.


Stream 4: Regenerative Design: The New Paradigm

Meeting Room 10

Regeneration Generation

Douglas Birkenshaw, Principal, B+H Architects; Kevin Stelzer, Principal, B+H Architects
Description: At the core of regenerative design theory is the aspiration for the built environment to form sustaining artificial ecologies that foster increasing human and non-human benefit. Buildings, analogous to natural or biotic organisms, exchange matter and energy with broader networks and systems. Buildings have analogous systems, or bio-memetic systems: breathing and cleansing air, collecting, filtering and discharging water, collecting and converting energy. Planted roofs, rainwater reuse, bio-filter walls, PV arrays all represent systems that make such exchanges. Is this exchange balanced and healthy, or is it toxic and wasteful? Can building design express such systems in an experiential way, such that occupants modify their behavior while witnessing and learning from the operation of these systems? Can behavior be positively modified with regenerative design? These questions will be examined within the context of a series of institutional building designs commissioned by extraordinary clients interested in addressing such issues.


Stream 5: Closing The Performance Gap: Realizing the Full Benefits of Green Buildings

Meeting Room 8

Performance Benchmarking of LEED Homes Using Hydro Data

LEED Specific (Homes) Marten Duhoux, Principal, ft3 Architecture Landscape Interior Design; Shokry Rashwan, Green Buildings Research Chair, Red River College

Description: There is a gap between projected and actual building performance. Projections are often based on complex and expensive models and their reliabilities, to some extent, are dependent on the skills of and assumptions made by the modeler. Projections can also be supported by, and in some cases the models themselves can be replaced with, realistic and less costly-to-produce benchmarks. This presentation describes how hydro billing data for 72 LEED homes in Manitoba are adapted to compare their actual vs projected performance, to analyze levels and causes of variability, to streamline the process of assessment itself and eventually to develop a "reliable" benchmark that can be used to improve energy projections of future similar (LEED) developments.

Session 2, 11:05 a.m. - 12:05 p.m.


Stream 1: Transitioning to LEED v4: The Path to Continuous Improvement

Meeting Room 11

The Power of Environmental Surfing for Human Health and Environmental Resiliency

LEED Specific (BD+C, ID+C)

Master Speaker: Vivian Loftness, University Professor and Paul Mellon Chair of Architecture, Carnegie Mellon University

Description: The built environment is integral with human health and environmental resiliency. A wide range of design decisions from land use and transportation, to daylighting, natural ventilation and views, from building systems, to materials and maintenance, will impact our respiratory, visual, audial, digestive, circulatory, musculo-skeletal, and nervous systems as well as our mental and social health. The evidence is convincing: healthy buildings and communities are designed to surf the environment for sustainable access to comfort, healthy air, clean water, material resources, mobility, community and the regenerative powers of nature itself.


Stream 2: New Tools and Programs to Increase Performance and Resiliency in Green Buildings

Meeting Room 12

Quick, Simple and Transparent Energy Modeling Tools for Designers

Richard Kroeker, MET Design, Trevor Butler, MET Design, Christian Cianfrone, Principal, Building Energy Specialist, Morrison Hershfield

Description: This session highlights some new energy simulation tools that provide fast, effective energy feedback to design teams. Experts will demonstrate the range of stages during which these tools can be used, from architectural concept to detailed design. The presenters will also work with participants to produce a live energy model using a simple, quick and transparent modeling tool – most suited to the early stages of design.


Stream 3: International Green Building Innovations: What Can We Learn?

Meeting Room 15

Healthy Buildings and the Bottom Line

Michelle Malanca, Vice President, World Green Building Council

Description: We need green buildings for the long-term health of our planet and ourselves. There is unequivocal evidence that building design can impact the health, well-being and productivity of occupants – meaning green buildings are also good for the health of businesses. Green Building Councils globally are working together to illustrate how the benefits of greener, healthier buildings can be tracked, managed and monetized. Using case studies, industry insights, and research data, this session will show why companies should occupy healthy buildings, what features have the biggest impact on health, and how you can access tools and information to realize these benefits.


Stream 4: Regenerative Design: The New Paradigm

Meeting Room 10

Living Building Challenge in Affordable Housing: Findings from the Field

Dale Mikkelsen, Director, Development, SFU Community Trust; Brita Carlson, Project Manager, Design Specialist, A Community of Friends; Hillary Noll, Designer, First Community Housing; Amanda Sturgeon, Executive Director, International Living Future Institute

Description: Affordable housing projects are uniquely situated to benefit from the application of the Living Building Challenge. A new report by the International Living Future Institute explores social, regulatory, and financial barriers to achieving the Challenge in affordable housing with an emphasis on the three most challenging Petals (Net Positive Water, Net Positive Energy and Materials). Actionable strategies and pathways to certification in a range of climates, developed through partnership with leading affordable housing developers and practitioners, are also presented. This session takes a look at findings of the report and includes first hand sharing from three projects in North America.


Stream 5: Closing The Performance Gap: Realizing the Full Benefits of Green Buildings

Meeting Room 8

Innovation and Results - How to Stay on the Performance Track

Vladimir Mikler, Principal, Integral Group; Goran Ostojic, Managing Principal, Integral Group; Ali Nazari, Principal, Integral Group; Clint Undseth, Vice President Innovation, Stuart Olson

Description: The majority of green buildings and their systems are essentially "prototypes", that often include new and innovative features that have not been extensively mastered and tested in the past. As such, there are numerous opportunities along the entire green building design-modelling-construction-commissioning-operation path for a gap to develop between the envisioned and predicted versus the actual building performance. This presentation will discuss in a step-by-step manner, from building concept to its actual operation, the most common causes for buildings failing to achieve their targeted and predicted performance. Drawing on experience,  typical examples of the performance gap and what corrective measures were applied to bring the building performance back on track will be illustrated.

Session 3, 4:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.


Stream 1: Transitioning to LEED v4: The Path to Continuous Improvement

Meeting Room 11

Life Cycle Assessment: A Better Way to Choose Materials (and a new v4 Credit)

LEED Specific (BD+C, ID+C)

Mark Lucuik, Principal, Director of Sustainability, Morrison Hershfield

Description: Life cycle assessment is the science of environmental footprinting, putting real numbers on sustainability performance. LCA reports on impact measures such as global warming potential, aquatic eutrophication, smog formation, and other real environmental and health impacts caused by the materials of a building. LCA can be a useful new skill set for offices or sustainability consultancies and LEED v4 awards three points for LCA. This presentation will explain the LEED LCA credit, provide an introduction to LCA, and demonstrate both how to easily earn the credit using a simple and free software tool, the Athena Impact Estimator for Buildings, and how to honestly reduce the environmental footprint of your building.


Stream 2: New Tools and Programs to Increase Performance and Resiliency in Green Buildings

Meeting Room 12

Health and Wellness in Green Buildings: A Case Study on the WELL Building Standard Applied to a LEED Platinum Project

Joanne Purdue, Chief Sustainability Officer, University of Calgary

Description:The mandate for the built environment to safeguard and promote health and wellbeing of building occupants continues to be one of the strongest motivators toward high performance green buildings. The WELL Building Standard is emerging as a best practice resource to support teams in their journey to optimize building projects around human health. This case study will present the findings of applying the WELL Building Standard to a LEED Platinum certified project at the University of Calgary. The audience will gain insight into the scope of the WELL standard, how it aligns and differs from LEED, and the anticipated challenges and benefits of using the standard.


Stream 3: International Green Building Innovations: What Can We Learn?

Meeting Room 15

City is Efficiency

Maria Vassilakou, Deputy Mayor and Executive City Councillor for Urban Planning for the City of Vienna, Austria

Description: Vienna is the fastest growing city within the German speaking countries. The city's dense and diverse spatial structures are therefor the basis for a sustainable development. Compact settlement pattern, a city of short distances, high quality of public space and a dense network of public transport create the overall system City as an ecological system for the future.Under the premises of radical resource preservation, development and productive use of innovations and new technologies as well as a high and socially balanced quality of living, the City of Vienna aims to remain and become an even greener and more liveable city than it is today.


Stream 4: Regenerative Design: The New Paradigm

Meeting Room 10

Changing the Storyline: From Green to Regenerative

Master Speaker: Ray Cole, Academic Director, University of British Columbia Centre for Interactive Research on Sustainability (CIRS)

Description: Green building strategies, performance goals, and associated assessment methods currently emphasize the ways and extent that buildings should reduce the degenerative consequences of human activity on the health and integrity of ecological systems. In contrast to this necessary but insufficient 'doing less harm' approach, the emerging notion of 'regenerative sustainability' is garnering attention as a more positive, complementary and engaging way forward. A central argument though the presentation will be the storylines embedded in the 'green' and 'regenerative' approaches and their potency to affect significant sustainability advances through building design and neighbourhood development. A comprehensive regenerative sustainability framework is offered that provides strategic direction to agencies and authorities engaged in neighbourhood scale developments and to design teams engaged in building projects within them.


Stream 5: Closing The Performance Gap: Realizing the Full Benefits of Green Buildings

Meeting Room 8

Mind the Gap: Energy Models and Actual Building Performance

Steve Kemp, Vice President, MMM Group Limited; Meghan Patterson, Energy Leader, Public Private Partnerships, Honeywell Ltd.

Description: The gap between building energy model predictions and utility bills is so expected that we have become resigned to it. Is this acceptable? Energy modeling is a garbage-in/garbage-out exercise and when all the inputs are known and match the building design and operation, models can make reliable predictions. So the real gaps are with respect the models inputs. Through the lens of experience in M&V, and developing performance guarantee energy models, this session will explore the known-knowns, the known-unknowns and the unknown-unknowns as well as identify some of the research being undertaken to help fill in the gaps.